The US flag still flies at Cement MT. In Colton

Located on the southern side of the 10 freeway in Colton on Slover, Cement Mountain has been a physical icon of the inland empire for over 150 years.

I remember as a kid going by the mountain on the 10 freeway with my parents on my way to my uncles house in Colton. Back then the MT was estimated to still be around 700 feet high. I often wondered how long it would be before the mountain disappeared and if they would stop digging and blasting for cement.

Cucamonga is alive with the dead

One of my relatives reports that when he was a kid delivering newspapers in Alta Loma he came around a corner one Sunday morning and found herself surrounded by dead confederate soldiers. Hundreds of them were crawling and reaching for her help. She was so horrified and scared that she threw the papers in the street and went home to get her mom. She said that she drove him back to the street to get the his papers and finish the route but also to see what it was that had so scarred him. But when she got back to the bloody scene we found nothing. Even the papers were gone.

Wyatt Earp; Thief, Marshall, Gold Miner was never injured in a gunfight.

As often the case of many old time lawmen, many of the best and most famous came from checkered backgrounds. Wyatt was one of those.

Wyatt was born in Montmouth, Illinois, in 1848. His father moved the entire family to San Bernardino, and as a teen, joined his older brother, Virgil, as a freighter-teamster between Wilmington to Prescott, Arizona during the 1860's.

In 1870 Earp was elected constable of Lamar, Missouri. Later that year he married his first wife, Urilla Sutherland, but she died about 3 months later of typhoid. His job as constable came to an end when Earp was arrested for horse theft which he denied but the local citizens decided they needed a change from his heavy fisted tactics when dealing with people. He managed to escape and became a buffalo hunter in Kansas. Earp then moved to Wichita where he married a local prostitute. He also joined the Wichita police force. However, he was fired again in April 1876 after a fight with a fellow officer over his previous indiscretions.

We Missed The Last Train to Eagle MT.

I have mentioned before that I and my friends went up into the Cajon Pass and did a lot of train watching. But that's not the only area we went to. One of our favorite spots to visit was the tracks running north of highway 10 from the Indo area and up pass Eagle MT peak and then down into what was at the time the main mine for Kaiser Steel located in Fontana.

Pages